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Kingdom of Ice

February 15, 2021  •  Leave a Comment

By the time I developed and scanned this roll of Ilford Delta 100 in 2020 winter has gone and I did not feel it was right to post more winter pictures. Let me share these cold photographs with you while it's cold and white out there before I miss my chance again.

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After a few year's break we are having a really nice winter. Snow has been around for several weeks, temperatures stayed well below freezing and dipped to single digits (Fahrenheit) nightly, and new snow fell almost every day to give the world around us a beautiful clean white look. That provided me with plenty of opportunities to go after new photographs but also to organize and post some white scenes from years past.

Hoak's Lakeshore Restaurant, Kingdom of Ice, Hamburg, NY. Photographed with a Nikon FE on Ilfod Delta 100 black and white film and developed in Kodak XTOL.Hoak's Lakeshore RestaurantKingdom of Ice

 

Hoak's Lakeshore Restaurant, Kingdom of Ice, Hamburg, NY
Photographed with a Nikon FE on Ilfod Delta 100 black and white film and developed in Kodak XTOL.

From this opening photo one would never know how the rest of the restaurant looked on this day. Being located right on the shore of Lake Erie at its southeastern tip it gets pummeled by weather quite often. Sometimes it is just the wind, other times high waves and water spray, and when that happens and temperatures drop below 32°F the building gets coated with ice.

Three Barrels in Ice, Kingdom of Ice, Hamburg, NY. Photographed with a Nikon FE on Ilfod Delta 100 black and white film and developed in Kodak XTOL.Three Barrels in IceKingdom of Ice

Three Barrels in Ice, Kingdom of Ice, Hamburg, NY
Photographed with a Nikon FE on Ilfod Delta 100 black and white film and developed in Kodak XTOL

Let's step around the corner and all of a sudden the sunny and almost warm look is replaced with a frigid Kingdom of Ice. Anything that got in the way of the wind and the water spray it carried ended up with a frozen coat of ice, including these three barrels.

Cart and Wheelbarrow in Ice, Kingdom of Ice, Hamburg, NY. Photographed with a Nikon FE on Ilfod Delta 100 black and white film and developed in Kodak XTOL.Cart and Wheelbarrow in IceKingdom of Ice

Cart and Wheelbarrow in Ice, Kingdom of Ice, Hamburg, NY.
Photographed with a Nikon FE on Ilfod Delta 100 black and white film and developed in Kodak XTOL

And just one more corner and we are looking at the lakefront patio of the restaurant completely locked in ice. It's on this side that the restaurant gets the full dose of Lake Erie's fury when weather turns vicious.

Lakefront Patio All in Ice, Kingdom of Ice, Hamburg, NY. Photographed with a Nikon FE on Ilfod Delta 100 black and white film and developed in Kodak XTOL.Lakefront Patio All in IceKingdom of Ice

Lakefront Patio All in Ice, Kingdom of Ice, Hamburg, NY.
Photographed with a Nikon FE on Ilfod Delta 100 black and white film and developed in Kodak XTOL

To close today's set, let's step a bit further down Route 5 for a nice overall view of the decorations. As you can see, the shoreline wall and the utility poles were not spared either.

Ice Wrapped, Kingdom of Ice, Hamburg, NY. Photographed with a Nikon FE on Ilfod Delta 100 black and white film and developed in Kodak XTOL.Ice WrappedKingdom of Ice

Ice Wrapped, Kingdom of Ice, Hamburg, NY
Photographed with a Nikon FE on Ilfod Delta 100 black and white film and developed in Kodak XTOL.

Enjoy The Beauty That Surrounds You! #etbtsy

Continued in Kingdom of Ice, Part 2

Do you enjoy reading my photography blog? Would you like to see more photographs from Buffalo and Western New York? Visit my Buffalo Cityscapes and Buffalo & Western New York Landscapes and enjoy! For more travel photography, my Travel Photography gallery offers an interesting mix of places all around. Please, let me know if you have any questions about any photo products offered, or not offered, I will be happy to help! For a quick reference to all photo galleries and collections as well as all photo products currently offered through my site, please, visit the Products page.

Using my links to do your shopping keeps me sharing more photographs and writing the stories behind them (commission earned) and costs you nothing. You can also use the Amazon search box in bottom left for anything at all. I truly appreciate each purchase, no matter how large, no matter how small. Thank you!

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Winter Squares

February 08, 2021  •  Leave a Comment

So apparently, my excitement for twin lens cameras (TLRs) was not just a summer fling. They carried me through fall and now well into the winter and they're still my favorite cameras to reach for. They are simple, have fixed lenses, yet result in gorgeous images on 120 film that provide plenty of quality to enjoy in any size prints.

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It's also another Caffenol diary for me as I continue that ride. I have to admit, it's with mixed results. And I don't mean mixed as so-so. When things work out I get excellent images to my liking and would not even need a different developer. However, I also had some results that were very bad. One 35mm roll was so thin I did not think I'd get any results from it. In the end, after scanning, some severe curves adjustments saved half of it. I attributed the failure to mixing Caffenol in the wrong sequence of ingredients resulting in intense foaming during inversions thus developing the film in foam for at least half the time.

Snow Covered Winter Entrance to the Wetlands Woods, Orchard Park, New YorkWinter EntranceOrchard Park, New York

Snow Covered Winter Entrance to the Wetlands Woods, Orchard Park, New York
Photographed with a 1940s Rolleiflex Automat twin-lens reflex camera on Fomapan 400 Black and White Negative Film
Developed in Caffenol Delta Recipe

Then one roll of 120 ended up in trash since it was even thinner and seemed to have a host of other issues, like overlapping frames, possibly suffering from camera shutter issues, and maybe more. I was testing a "new" camera, a Pentacon Six, which to a naked eye appears to be working perfectly fine. But could I really see a hesitating shutter at 1/60 of a second? I also suspected that maybe somehow the film slipped during loading it on the real and ended up multiple times in the same groove preventing proper development. But I am not yet sure about either. And finally, I've had that roll of JCH Street Pan 400 sitting in the basement for couple years. That should not really be a concern but it is a film I shoot infrequently. Bottom line? Some failures with unproven theories about why. It could be there's something wrong with my Caffenol process. But what? The other 50% of my rolls end up just about perfect. A conundrum indeed.

Snow Covered Spooky Winter Wetlands, Orchard Park, New YorkSpooky Winter WetlandsOrchard Park, New York

Snow Covered Spooky Winter Wetlands, Orchard Park, New York
Photographed with a 1940s Rolleiflex Automat twin-lens reflex camera on Fomapan 400 Black and White Negative Film
Developed in Caffenol Delta Recipe

Anyway, let's switch over to the positive side. Today's roll of Fomapan 400 was a nice rewarding success. It followed a similar success with Fomapan 200, a film with a different emulsion. With the 200 version I expected good things. Since Caffenol Delta was tuned to develop Ilford Delta T-Grained film I was assuming it would work similar magic with the Fomapan 200 hybrid emulsion. Since that was a definite success I wanted to see how a traditional emulsion of the 400 would react. And I like what I got again!

Snow Covered Winter Camp Shelter, Orchard Park, New YorkWinter CampOrchard Park, New York

Snow Covered Winter Camp Shelter, Orchard Park, New York
Photographed with a 1940s Rolleiflex Automat twin-lens reflex camera on Fomapan 400 Black and White Negative Film
Developed in Caffenol Delta Recipe

As you can see, the theme was very timely. We have had a nice winter so far in January and going into February and on couple occasions got some wet snow sticking to the trees creating a beautiful natural winter wonderland. It's times like that I love photography even more. It's often that extra push that gets me out of the door into the cold. And once I am out, it's all good. The laziness dissipates and winter beauty is all around!

Snow Covered Nose in Winter, Wetlands Woods and Trees, Orchard Park, New YorkThe NoseOrchard Park, New York

Snow Covered Nose in Winter, Wetlands Woods and Trees, Orchard Park, New York
Photographed with a 1940s Rolleiflex Automat twin-lens reflex camera on Fomapan 400 Black and White Negative Film
Developed in Caffenol Delta Recipe

Enjoy The Beauty That Surrounds You! #etbtsy

References: You can find a whole publication dedicated to Caffenol recipes here: The Caffenol Cookbook.

Do you enjoy reading my photography blog? Would you like to see more photographs from Buffalo and Western New York? Visit my Buffalo Cityscapes and Buffalo & Western New York Landscapes and enjoy! For more travel photography, my Travel Photography gallery offers an interesting mix of places all around. Please, let me know if you have any questions about any photo products offered, or not offered, I will be happy to help! For a quick reference to all photo galleries and collections as well as all photo products currently offered through my site, please, visit the Products page.

Using my links to do your shopping keeps me sharing more photographs and writing the stories behind them (commission earned) and costs you nothing. You can also use the Amazon search box in bottom left for anything at all. I truly appreciate each purchase, no matter how large, no matter how small. Thank you!

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Barn and silos in white in winter storm in Buffalo and Western New YorkBarn and Silos in WhiteWinter Snowstorm over three roofs, winter storm in Buffalo and Western New YorkSnowstorm over Three RoofsWinter


Some Thoughts on Film Digitization

February 01, 2021  •  Leave a Comment

Today, I have something definitely different for you. Today's post is about the process of film digitization, i.e. the process that takes the analog images captured on film and converts them into digital images that can be seen on our electronic gadgets, shared over the internet, or digitally printed. If you're here for photos and the behind the scenes stories, I am sorry but you will have to skip today's post and come back next week. In a way, this is more of a journal entry for me to have a reminder of the process I have already gone through so that I can improve it.

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This whole story has been developing for several months now. For the most part, I am comfortable with my digitization process having been doing it for over three years now. But I ran into problems with one of my rolls from the fall. It was a roll of Kodak Ektachrome E100, which I underexposed a little bit. And I am yet to get acceptable images out of it despite the frames looking quite well on a light table.

So first, the baseline. How do I digitize film? For 35mm black and white and 35mm color negative film, I use the Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE scanner along with the supplied SilverFast software and I am very happy with the results I get. However, positive slide film has been a challenge with that scanner and software for me, even if counterintuitive. For medium format (120) film, I use the Epson V600 flatbed scanner with the supplied Epson software. And again, I am quite happy with my results. And finally, when I entered the area of large format photography, I had to find yet another solution. I looked into buying the Epson V850 scanner but was not all that excited about the $1,100+ price tag. On top of that, they've been out of stock for several months now and I am wondering whether they are ever coming back.

As you can see now I have three different digitization methods available to me, each with a specific purpose. However, it just so happens, that all of them can be used to digitize 35mm film. So I decided to give them all a shot with the troublesome roll. My goal? Which method would give me the most pleasing results. I wanted to get decent natural colors and acceptable sharpness. No, I was not looking for perfection, just really good if at all possible.

Below, I take you through three photographs, Sample A, Sample B, and Sample C, and show you the results I got from a dedicated 35mm scanner, a digital camera, and a flatbed scanner. For each digitization method I show the full size photo as well as a 100% crop to sow you the detail captured in full resolution.

--- Sample A ---

Sample A - Dedicated 35mm Scanner, Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast SoftwareSample A - Dedicated 35mm ScannerPlustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample A - Dedicated 35mm Scanner
Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample A - Dedicated 35mm Scanner - 100% Crop, Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast SoftwareSample A - Dedicated 35mm Scanner - 100% CropPlustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample A - Dedicated 35mm Scanner - 100% Crop
Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample A - Digital Camera, Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger StandSample A - Digital CameraNikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand

Sample A - Digital Camera
Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand

Sample A - Digital Camera - 100% Crop, Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger StandSample A - Digital Camera - 100% CropNikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand
Sample A - Digital Camera - 100% Crop
Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand

Sample A - Flatbed Scanner, Epson V600, Epson SoftwareSample A - Flatbed ScannerEpson V600, Epson Software

Sample A - Flatbed Scanner
Epson V600, Epson Software

Sample A - Flatbed Scanner - 100% Crop
Epson V600, Epson SoftwareSample A - Flatbed Scanner - 100% CropEpson V600, Epson Software

Sample A - Flatbed Scanner - 100% Crop
Epson V600, Epson Software

--- Sample B ---

Sample B - Dedicated 35mm Scanner, Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast SoftwareSample B - Dedicated 35mm ScannerPlustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample B - Dedicated 35mm Scanner
Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample B - Dedicated 35mm Scanner - 100% Crop, Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast SoftwareSample B - Dedicated 35mm Scanner - 100% CropPlustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample B - Dedicated 35mm Scanner - 100% Crop
Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample B - Digital Camera, Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger StandSample B - Digital CameraNikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand

Sample B - Digital Camera
Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand

Sample B - Digital Camera - 100% Crop, Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger StandSample B - Digital Camera - 100% CropNikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand
Sample B - Digital Camera - 100% Crop
Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand

Sample B - Flatbed Scanner, Epson V600, Epson SoftwareSample B - Flatbed ScannerEpson V600, Epson Software

Sample B - Flatbed Scanner
Epson V600, Epson Software

Sample B - Flatbed Scanner - 100% Crop, Epson V600, Epson SoftwareSample B - Flatbed Scanner - 100% CropEpson V600, Epson Software

Sample B - Flatbed Scanner - 100% Crop
Epson V600, Epson Software

--- Sample C ---

Sample C - Dedicated 35mm Scanner, Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast SoftwareSample C - Dedicated 35mm ScannerPlustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample C - Dedicated 35mm Scanner
Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample C - Dedicated 35mm Scanner - 100% Crop, Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast SoftwareSample C - Dedicated 35mm Scanner - 100% CropPlustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample C - Dedicated 35mm Scanner - 100% Crop
Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE, SilverFast Software

Sample C - Digital Camera, Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger StandSample C - Digital CameraNikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand

Sample C - Digital Camera
Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand

Sample C - Digital Camera - 100% Crop, Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger StandSample C - Digital Camera - 100% CropNikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand
Sample C - Digital Camera - 100% Crop
Nikon D610, Tokina atx-i 100mm f/2.8 FF Macro Lens, Enlarger Stand

Sample C - Flatbed Scanner, Epson V600, Epson SoftwareSample C - Flatbed ScannerEpson V600, Epson Software

Sample C - Flatbed Scanner
Epson V600, Epson Software

Sample C - Flatbed Scanner - 100% Crop, Epson V600, Epson SoftwareSample C - Flatbed Scanner - 100% CropEpson V600, Epson Software

Sample C - Flatbed Scanner - 100% Crop
Epson V600, Epson Software

So what did this rather time consuming exercise give me? Rather disappointing results. From a sharpness point of view, the Plustek scanner definitely won. I got disappointingly blurry images from my digital camera. Here, the film was held in place using the decently sturdy Plustek film holder. The flatbed was blurry too, probably mostly due to the absolutely flimsy film holders that didn't prevent cupping and thus the film plane was far from flat.

From a color accuracy point of view, the digital camera won, followed closely by the flatbed. The Plustek was by far the worst. It made the photos look more like something one would get from a color negative film, not even close to what I saw on a light table. I'd guess this is most likely due to Silverfast but why it does so well with negatives and so poorly with positives I don't know.

The bottom line is that I still don't have acceptable digital photos from this roll. And I am quite discouraged having invested so much time into it already. But I will give it another try as I am convinced I can get more out of the digital camera. Possible improvements? Several: I used a 3-second exposure delay with mirror lock-up but triggered the shutter manually pressing the camera shutter button. Even after 3 seconds, there could have been some camera shake remaining. I must use a remote release next time. Despite the Plustek film holder being sturdy and clearly yielding decent results in the scanner I can get an even better holder that should hold the film flatter. And I should be able to do the digitization in tethered mode while observing the results on a much larger screen for immediate focusing feedback.

There will be a follow up at some point ...

Enjoy The Beauty That Surrounds You! #etbtsy

PS: And no, this was not my first time trying digital camera scanning. I have been trying to improve my process for quite a while while definitely not relying on it as my primary scanning method (see the top of the post for my current process). During that time, I improved my backlighting, mounted the camera on a sturdy stand, switched from using extension tubes to a dedicated macro lens, eliminated subtle reflections by enclosing my rig in a black tube, and probably more. I know several people who get excellent results to their full satisfaction but I am not one of them (yet). Until that day, I need my scanners.

Using my links to do your shopping keeps me sharing more photographs and writing the stories behind them (commission earned) and costs you nothing. You can also use the Amazon search box in bottom left for anything at all. I truly appreciate each purchase, no matter how large, no matter how small. Thank you!


Winter Stopped By, Part 2

January 13, 2021  •  Leave a Comment

... continued from Winter Stopped By

While I did not intend on this being a two-part post here we are back to the wonderful Birdsong Park in Orchard Park, New York. Not only did I have more photos to share but I completely forgot about including some technical information last time. I usually skip the technical details and focus on the images and the experience but sometimes, I get excited enough about the process to share, and that is what I would like to do here.

Support this blog: Do you like my free content but are not ready to buy a photograph yet? Using my links (Amazon) to do your shopping helps me share more photographs and write the stories behind them.

So what got me so excited to really want to go into the details? It's the chemistry! I develop almost all of my film in commercial developers and for black and white negatives, I've settled on Kodak XTOL or it's alternatives, like the LegacyPro EcoPro developer. I like the balanced contrast that gets me, the sharpness, and just the right amount of grain to my taste. And I really enjoy developing film myself. I am pretty sure I would not be a dedicated film photographer if I did not do my own development. To me, that is the essence of the experience, even if time consuming.

Through the Winter Landscape, Birdsong Park, Orchard Park, New YorkThrough the Winter LandscapeBirdsong Park

Through the Winter Landscape, Birdsong Park, Orchard Park, New York
Photographed with a Yashica LM twin-lens reflex on Fomapan 200 Black and White Negative Film
Developed in Caffenol Delta Recipe

However, here and there my curiosity gets the better of me and I need to try something else. This time, I intended from the very beginning to run this roll of Fomapan 200 through Caffenol. Fomapan 100 and 400 have been my go to black and white films for a long while but for a bad reason I stayed away from 200. A bad reason you ask? I read a few articles on various message boards and online groups and they all raved about how good the classic grain of the 100 and 400 is while they decried Fomapan 200. After years, I finally bought a roll of 200 and decided to give it a whirl.

The Creek Guard Tree in Winter, Birdsong Park, Orchard Park, New YorkThe Creek GuardBirdsong Park

The Creek Guard Tree in Winter, Birdsong Park, Orchard Park, New York
Photographed with a Yashica LM twin-lens reflex on Fomapan 200 Black and White Negative Film
Developed in Caffenol Delta Recipe

I also wanted to give Caffenol another shot. I had used it a few times in the past but was somewhat neutral about my results. I actually liked my results with darkroom prints in Caffenol more than my film developing. However, I had seen several outstanding photos developed in a different recipe, specifically Caffenol Delta. It is my understanding the recipe was fine-tuned specifically for Ilford Delta films, which have T-Grain emulsions. Since Fomapan 200 is a hybrid, I figured why not give the same recipe a try. It is a very simple recipe:

  • 1000ml Water
  • 45g Instant coffee
  • 24g Washing soda
  • 20g Vitamin C

Even though this recipe does not call for Potassium Bromide (KBr) I added 1mg. I had it available and I also wanted to develop a higher speed film with it. I used the first 500ml for Fomapan 200 and the other 500ml for Agfa APX 400 exposed at EI 800. To complete the technical details here, I developed this roll of Fomapan 200 at 68°F for 12 minutes. I am so happy with the results that I will definitely try even the classic Fomapan 100 and 400 in the same recipe. What gets me so excited about Caffenol? I love that it is easy to make at home with mostly easily accessible ingredients, and I love the almost zero toxicity. Yes, I ended up adding KBr, but only 1mg along with 1,089mg of other environment friendly ingredients, which is less that 0.1%.

White Trail of Wonders, Birdsong Park, Orchard Park, New YorkWhite Trail of WondersBirdsong Park

White Trail of Wonders, Birdsong Park, Orchard Park, New York
Photographed with a Yashica LM twin-lens reflex on Fomapan 200 Black and White Negative Film
Developed in Caffenol Delta Recipe

So there you have it, the look of winter combined with silver, coffee, vitamin C, and washing soda. What's not to like? I'll admit, I am hooked!

Enjoy The Beauty That Surrounds You! #etbtsy

References: You can find a whole publication dedicated to Caffenol recipes here: The Caffenol Cookbook.

Do you enjoy reading my photography blog? Would you like to see more photographs from Buffalo and Western New York? Visit my Buffalo Cityscapes and Buffalo & Western New York Landscapes and enjoy! For more travel photography, my Travel Photography gallery offers an interesting mix of places all around. Please, let me know if you have any questions about any photo products offered, or not offered, I will be happy to help! For a quick reference to all photo galleries and collections as well as all photo products currently offered through my site, please, visit the Products page.

Using my links to do your shopping keeps me sharing more photographs and writing the stories behind them (commission earned) and costs you nothing. You can also use the Amazon search box in bottom left for anything at all. I truly appreciate each purchase, no matter how large, no matter how small. Thank you!

Icy Pier in Winter, Sturgeon Point Marina.Icy PierWinter Wonderland Icicle Formation, Lake Erie Shore in Winter, Sturgeon PointIcicle FormationWinter Wonderland Broken tree in winter storm in Buffalo and Western New YorkBrokenWinter Wonderland

Eighteen Mile Creek Bend in Winter, Hamburg, NY on FilmEighteen Mile Creek Bend in WinterWinter Wonderland Reaching for Life, a Tree Branch Peeking through Ice and Snow at Emery Park.ReachingWinter Wonderland


Winter Stopped By

January 04, 2021  •  Leave a Comment

On Christmas Eve 2020, the weather decided to cooperate and sent a nice dose of puffy snow our way. Waking up the next morning was quite magical with almost a foot of snow on the ground and trees coated in white. It was time for a family walk and definitely an opportunity to take a camera along. The location choice? Birdsong Park right in Orchard Park, New York.

Support this blog: Do you like my free content but are not ready to buy a photograph yet? Using my links (Amazon) to do your shopping helps me share more photographs and write the stories behind them.

We were the first ones to arrive for a walk there. The road leading to the parking lot loop was plowed but the parking spaces were not. With a four wheel drive vehicle and a shovel in the trunk the foot of snow was not going to stop us even if the snow plow created an even higher barrier to enter. Off to the side we pushed in, parked, and set for our walk.

We had to make our own path through the field before entering the woods, which made walking more challenging but also more rewarding and definitely created a wonderful winter mood. Nothing quite matches the feeling of walking through fresh snow, feet sinking ankle deep or more with fresh cold air to breathe.

As always, this park does not kid around and has some beautiful sites to offer as soon as one turns into the woods on the first boardwalk. The path leads over a wet area and a creek and looks beautiful on both sides. I usually find the view to the left more appealing but this morning I believe the right-hand side actually had an edge with the trees and branches covered in pristine white snow.

Snowy Winter Creek at Birdsong, Orchard Park, New YorkWinter Creek at BirdsongOrchard Park, New York

Snowy Winter Creek at Birdsong, Orchard Park, New York
Photographed with a Yashica LM twin-lens reflex on Fomapan 200 Black and White Negative Film
Developed in Caffenol Delta Recipe

It's beautiful occasions like these that the camera of choice drives my photography quite a bit. With the Yashica twin lens reflex camera being loaded with 120 film I only had 12 frames for the morning. And since this was a family walk I wanted to keep things simple and did not even bring a spare roll. Thus, 12 it was to be split between portraits and landscape photos. With a 35mm roll of 36 I would have probably gone crazy and used up the whole roll too. As a result, the shorter roll held me back and made me pick and choose. That is not a complaint, that was a good thing. This being one of my favorite local destinations I already have many photos in all seasons and being choosy is the right approach, I believe.

Branches Dressed for Winter, Birdsong Park, Orchard Park, New YorkBranches Dressed for WinterOrchard Park, New York

Branches Dressed for Winter, Birdsong Park, Orchard Park, New York
Photographed with a Yashica LM twin-lens reflex on Fomapan 200 Black and White Negative Film
Developed in Caffenol Delta Recipe

Despite the need for restraint, this spot got me. After two frames to the right I just had to take a picture of the scene on the left too. The tree bent over the creek forming a gate has been my favorite for a long time and it looked very nice this morning, Even its reflection in the creek looked better with all of the snow around.

Birdsong Park Gate in Winter, Orchard Park, New YorkBirdsong Gate in WinterOrchard Park, New York

Birdsong Park Gate in Winter, Orchard Park, New York
Photographed with a Yashica LM twin-lens reflex on Fomapan 200 Black and White Negative Film
Developed in Caffenol Delta Recipe

Later that day more snow arrived and we were knee deep making for even more charming walks. Unfortunately, true to the last few years, the winter wonderland did not last long and a warm front arrived and rained on the parade. I already look forward for the next winter visit. Still, even if brief, I love winter landscapes. Snow covers everything up and creates nice clean and simple landscapes. Come on winter, come back and bring it on!

Enjoy The Beauty That Surrounds You! #etbtsy

Do you enjoy reading my photography blog? Would you like to see more photographs from Buffalo and Western New York? Visit my Buffalo Cityscapes and Buffalo & Western New York Landscapes and enjoy! For more travel photography, my Travel Photography gallery offers an interesting mix of places all around. Please, let me know if you have any questions about any photo products offered, or not offered, I will be happy to help! For a quick reference to all photo galleries and collections as well as all photo products currently offered through my site, please, visit the Products page.

Using my links to do your shopping keeps me sharing more photographs and writing the stories behind them (commission earned) and costs you nothing. You can also use the Amazon search box in bottom left for anything at all. I truly appreciate each purchase, no matter how large, no matter how small. Thank you!

Watchman's Big Toe, Green Lake, Yates Park, Orchard Park, NY in WinterWatchman's Big ToeWinter Winter Lakeshore, Rocks, Sand, Ice, and Snow at Sturgeon Point on Lake ErieWinter LakeshoreWinter The Green Lake Watchmen, Yates Park, Orchard Park, NY in WinterThe Green Lake WatchmenWinter

Puffed Up Smoke Creek, Green Lake at Yates Park, Orchard Park, New YorkPuffed Up Smoke CreekWinter Frosty Horseshoe Falls of NIagara Falls, Ontario, Canada and New York State (NY), United States (USA).Frosty Horseshoe FallsWinter

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